2017/01/20 UPDATE on the IHDI

on Jan 20, 2017 in Archive Donations, homepage

IHDI Accomplishments

Social Support and Awareness:

  • Nearly one million website visitors each year and growing.
  • 4,000 daily visitors to English language website.
  • 500 daily visitors to Spanish language website.
  • Social networking with numerous chat rooms.
  • 50-75 daily contacts for information or other purposes.

Education:

  1. Validated educational modules for diagnosis with testing documentation.
  2. Validated educational module for initial treatment with testing documentation.
  3. Teaching boxes of standardized educational materials with the following materials:
  • Dr. Price’s instruction information.
  • DDH education module.
  • Pre /post tests.
  • Brochures.
  • Hippy baby exam simulator.
  • Pavlik Harness application video.
  • Specialized doll in Pavlik harness for teaching initial treatment method.
  • Pavlik Harness test for assessment of technical skills.
  • Public service announcement for Spanish TV audiences.
  1. Provided five international courses in the past four years.
  2. Three webinars completed, recorded and uploaded on the website.
  3. Publication of DDH papers for Orthopedic Clinics of North America.

Outreach:

  1. Assisting efforts in Ecuador to promote hip dysplasia prevention.
  2. Working with Pediatric Orthopedic Society’s Committee in underdeveloped regions.
  3. Educational efforts for physicians in Mexico and Middle East.

Advocacy:

  1. Published DDH educational statement regarding harmful swaddling. Subsequently, adopted and promoted by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons.
  2. Published DDH educational statement regarding infant carrying devices.
  3. 300,000+ brochures sent to pediatricians, parents and community activists.
  4. 300,000+ wristbands sent for “Healthy Hips for Life” awareness (33 countries).
  5. National Hip dysplasia awareness events (in association with One Hip World, 5-K running events, wine tasting event).

Fund Raising:

  1. Corporate support.
  2. Sips for Hips – Crowd Funding event held in multiple states nationwide.
  3. One Hip World – advocacy group.
  4. Other resources.

Research:

  1. Multi-center registry.
  2. Approximately 30 scientific papers published and guided by the questions from Cara Whitney – more under development.
  3. IHDI Classification for comparison of DDH severity – proven reliable and predictive.
  4. Computer simulation of DDH for future modeling and testing.

▪              Computer modeling of innovative brace methods to improve bracing effectiveness.

▪              Computer modeling of “baby-wearing” on hip reduction and development.

  1. Supported British study of prenatal nutritional influences of hip dysplasia risk.
  2. Completing study of bulky diaper cover for mildly dysplastic hips.

Innovation:

  1. Case discussions for discovery of opinions and research needs.
  2. Search for historical, cultural and alternative approaches.
  3. Translational thinking from other fields – adult hip, dogs, other newborn deficiencies.
  4. Identify and challenge widely held practices such as closed reduction and screening.
  5. Question historical origins, implementation and outcomes in light of new technology.
  6. Explore unusual methods of prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

 

Opportunities & Benefits

Since January 2016, over 40 companies have produced products that have been acknowledged as “Hip Healthy”. Numerous manufacturers have redesigned their products to comply with our recommendations. This corporate compliance is encouraging and positions IHDI for a number of different options (corporate partnerships, “Hip Healthy Certifications”, etc.).

In a recent study published in The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, total hip arthroplasty is estimated to grow by 174 percent by 2030 and the need for hip revisions is expected to double by 2026. The increased number of hip surgeries performed at Orlando Health reflects this growing trend. With 10 percent of total hip surgeries being a result of hip dysplasia, additional recognition and promotion seem a viable option.